Saturday, 12 July 2014

New additions to the ‘library’

It has been awhile since I added any new books to my collection of some 100-odd physical books and 500-plus ebooks. Earlier this week I bought two used paperbacks, a mystery and a western. I don’t think twice before picking up westerns. I have some two dozen of them, unread as yet. The sight of the horseback paperbacks makes me want to read them right away. I probably would have if I didn't read anything else. Among all fiction I like the cover art of western novels the most.

The two books I picked up were Only a Matter of Time, 1969, a Dell Murder Ink Mystery, by V.C. Clinton Baddeley, and The Texan, 2001, by Joan Johnston, an American writer of over forty contemporary and historical romance novels. Both are new authors for me.

Born in Devon, England, Baddeley’s full name was Victor Vaughan Reynolds Geraint Clinton-Baddeley. He was more than a writer; he was also involved in theatre and plays, films, and radio. He wrote both fiction and nonfiction including Death’s Bright Dart reviewed by Yvette at In So Many Words… Steve at Mystery File has a more detailed piece about the author.

The back of the book has this to say about Only a Matter of Time: “On Friday afternoon, the directors of Bexminster Electronics were gathering for a top secret meeting. And a few miles down the road, the inhabitants of King’s Lacey were preparing for their annual festival. No one dreamed that the weekend would be shattered by mayhem and murder. Certainly not Dr. Davie, the distinguished poetry professor with a knack for detective work.”


Dr. R.V. Davie is V.C. Clinton-Baddeley’s main protagonist who is in search of diversion in what I think is a nice little mystery about poetic justice, so to speak.

In The Texan, Joan Johnston, the New York Times bestselling author of The Cowboy, “weaves a tale of two feuding families—the Blackthornes and the Creeds—and of two extraordinary people, loner Owen Blackthorne and beautiful, headstrong Bayleigh Creed, irresistibly drawn to each other despite the desperate odds against their love.”

This is the first time I’d be reading a true romantic western with a sex scene or two. I hope it works as well as the westerns I’m used to reading which is usually about a lone cowboy or gunfighter in search of some meaning in life.


I'll finish this post with a vague thought on who I'd like to see as the two lead actors in the remake of Tombstone, 1993, should there be one. I'd like to see either Leonardo DiCaprio or Brad Pitt replace Kurt Russell as Wyatt Earp and Jude Law or Matt Damon step into the shoes of Val Kilmer as Doc Holliday. What do you think?

11 comments:

  1. I like western cover art but probably like best the old 60s and 70s SF and fantasy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Charles, I thought of sf and fantasy cover art, too, except that I haven't seen or read enough to form an opinion. But I can seen why they'd appeal to a lot of people who read in the genre. I have read more sf short stories online than full-length novels.

      Delete
  2. Prashant, I hope you make this a regular feature on your blog, as I'm always interested to see what other friends have picked up. I'm not tempted by these particular additions, but I still like to read about them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Col, that'll depend on how often I buy new "used" books since I almost never buy new books. Of course, I could write about the ebooks I buy online or download free and legally. The Baddeley novel was a surprise find and the protagonist sounds rather interesting.

      Delete
  3. I love Tombstone and rewatch it often. I liked the casting choices and I really liked Val Kilmer as Doc Holliday but that's me. I'll be curious to know what you think of THE TEXAN by Johnston. *g* I used to read a lot of romances before I started reading crime fiction. I don't think I've read her books. I'm pretty sure her westerns are not so much the same as the westerns you're used to reading but who knows. This will be a good experiment for you and I hope you enjoy it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Keishon, thank you. I liked TOMBSTONE, too, and have seen it more than once. I thought casting Val Kilmer as Doc Holliday was perfect too, complementing Kurt Russell, Sam Elliot, and Bill Paxton as the Earp brothers. Have you seen the earlier version which has the recently deceased James Garner as Wyatt Earp and Jason Robards as Doc Holliday? An equally good film minus the high octane drama.

      I picked up THE TEXAN because it was a western and also because I hadn't heard of or read anything by Joan Johnston. I'll probably do a short review after I read it.

      Delete
    2. Nope, I haven't seen any other version of Wyatt Earp. Playing it safe and sticking to the version I enjoyed. Even skipped Kevin Costner's effort with Dennis Quaid as Doc Holliday and many peopled liked him in that role.

      Delete
    3. Keishon, I haven't seen the Costner-Quaid version, which I intend to see. However, I strongly recommend the Garner-Robards version called HOUR OF THE GUN. It is a very good film. Garner, with his studied silence, is in his element.

      Delete
  4. I don't know how I missed these posts, Prashant. Sorry to be so late.

    More interesting books. You are so disciplined in your book buying. I have never read anything by V.C. Clinton Baddeley, but I have other mysteries with that type of cover, with the puzzle piece. The book does sound good.

    I can see Matt Damon in Tombstone, and I suppose Leonardo DiCaprio would be OK too. But I just love Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tracy, no need for an apology. Please feel free to visit and comment whenever you can. I already have more books than I can read and I owe my "discipline" in book buying primarily to lack of space than anything else. Of course, I'm unlikely to pass up an opportunity to buy a rare book.

      Delete