Wednesday, 23 January 2019

‘So many books, so little time'

When it comes to reading, I don't make New Year's resolutions though I mentally resolve to buy fewer books so I can read the ones I already have and give them away or sell them at the old scrap and paper mart. Actually, the scrap dealer, or raddiwala as we call him, comes home with a ball of twine and a pair of scales and buys all our old newspapers, journals and books, and whatever else we intend to dispose of. He helps us to declutter. I have to get rid of my books this way because I can't think of anyone who'll want them, let alone read them, and besides we don't have any libraries in the suburb where I live.

Last year, I kept half my promise. I bought just about a dozen secondhand books and read so very few books there was no point in writing about it.

This year, surprisingly, it has been the other way around.

Less than two weeks into 2019, I added four "new" books to my TBR-stretched bookcases and, happily, also read an equal number. My plan is to read at least seven books and novellas every month, plus as many short stories and poetry as I can. With time not so much on my side, I will be reviewing only a few select books every month.


© Penguin
Of the four books I purchased at the Books by Weight exhibition, I'm eager to read my Penguin edition of The White Nile (1960) by Alan Moorehead, the Australian-born war correspondent and author of popular history books. 

I have been curious about this historically relevant book, which is about "the daring exploration of the Nile River in the second half of the nineteenth century, which was at that time the most mysterious and impenetrable region on earth" and is considered "a seminal work in tales of discovery and escapade, filled with incredible historical detail and compelling stories of heroism and drama."

The other books included two Black Horse Westerns—Madigan's Sidekick by Hank J. Kirby and The Dying Tree by Edward Thomson—and a Mickey Spillane, whose title eludes me as I write this from my office. Edward Thomson was one of many pseudonyms of the late Edwin Charles Tubb, a popular British writer of science fiction, fantasy and western novels.

© Prashant C. Trikannad
Separately, my wife bought three books—Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (as a replacement), Father Brown by G.K. Chesterton and The Railway Children by Edith Nesbit. I hope to read the last two.

I also bought a few ebooks but that's a guilt-trip for another day.


In the picture, our pet Stubs is keeping an eye (or shut-eye) on my newly-acquired western hardbacks.

9 comments:

  1. The White Nile sounds both interesting and hopefully entertaining - I hope you're able to find time to review it!

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    1. FictionFan, I plan to read THE WHITE NILE in February. I will also try and review it, or at least offer my thoughts on it. I love reading history and the origins of places.

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  2. I hope you enjoy them all, Prashant. I'm looking forward to your reviews.

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    1. Col, I'm looking forward to reading THE WHITE NILE though I'm not so sure I'll do justice to a review. It appears to be a rather difficult read. Maybe I'll voice my thoughts.

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  3. I hear ya, Prashant, so many books and so many good books. I’ve got a pile of old paperbacks and many new works on the Kindle. Happy reading in 2019.

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    1. Elgin, Kindle and other ebooks are affecting my reading of paper books and I have dozens of those, mostly unread. I need to balance the two, perhaps couple of ebooks and four-five paper books every month. Happy reading to you, too!

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  4. I am fascinated by the idea of the scrap dealer coming to your house to weigh and take away! I wish we had that, it would make me clear things a bit more.
    Look forward to hearing about your new reads.

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  5. I know just what you mean, Prashant, about having more books than time. I find it so hard to part with books, too, even if I know I won't have the time to read them for a long while, if ever. It's one of the few ways in which I don't clear out periodically. I hope you'll enjoy your reads.

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  6. I haven't read any Father Brown stories, Prashant, but I hope to some day. Same for The Railway Children.

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